New York Times

Victims of Andrew Jarecki’s Film Ask Academy To Reconsider

When Andrew Jarecki’s controversial film, Capturing The Friedmans, was nominated for an Oscar,  victims of the film spoke out, writing a letter Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.  Andrew Jarecki’s portrayed the victims in his film as if they had invented their stories to satisfy an overzealous Nassau County police force.

According to the New York Times, the letter stated:

”We did not lie. We did not exaggerate. We were never hypnotized to tell our stories.” They said the director had twisted the facts in the film to make it appear that they had.

If the film wins an Oscar, they wrote, ”it will be won at the expense of silencing the plaintive voices of abused children once again, just as our own voices were silenced 16 years ago by the threats and intimidation of our tormentors.”

One of the victims who helped write the letter to the academy, also wrote a letter to the judge who presided over the case:

”This director’s [Andrew Jarecki] cause is wrong and his purpose is self-serving at my expense as well as at the expense of other victims.” 

Andrew Jarecki New York Times

Read the full letter on the Leadership Council website.  The Leadership council website is a resource of psychologists who specialize in child molestation.  The council has found fault with Andrew Jarecki’s film, and the manipulative tactics he used to create more ambiguity in his film, in hopes to make more money off his film.

Andrew Jarecki Inconsistent In Defending Research

New York Times

In the New York Times article, “Victims Say Film on Molesters Distorts Facts,” author Sharon Waxman highlights the scrutiny faced by film director Andrew Jarecki and his work in Capturing the Friedmans.

When the New York Times asked Andrew Jarecki about his research for the film, Jarecki was inconsistent in his responses to the questions.  Furthermore, Jarecki was asked about a lie-detector test that Jesse Friedman took and failed while he protested his innocence, to which Jarecki claimed he knew nothing about the test.  However, an interview online revealed Jarecki had knowledge when he spoke in detail about the lie-detector test, saying he considered it “inconclusive.”

The New York Times article also brings to light the lack of in-depth research Andrew Jarecki conducted during his film production.  Lawyer Salvatore Marinello, who represented four of the victims involved in the case, told the New York Times that Andrew Jarecki, made no effort to reach his clients for interviews for his film.

”I see the film as a capsulized version of what was taking place in the Friedman household during the time the case was pending,” Mr. Marinello said. ”There’s no doubt that it’s fascinating. But why are we reliving these events? Because some director decided to make a movie. They believe the motion filed on Jesse’s behalf was simply a result of publicity garnered from the movie, that there’s no factual basis.”

Resources:

 

Victims Plead Academy to Discount Director Andrew Jarecki’s Film

It has been cited by several  sources that the Director of the film Capturing the Friedmans, Andrew Jarecki, skewed evidence and interviews given by victims.  The victims stated that Jarecki’s film portrayed them as if they had invented their stories to satisfy an overzealous Nassau County police force.   As a result, the deceived victims reached out to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, when Jarecki’s film was nominated for an Oscar.

According the the New York Times, the victims letter to the Academy stated:

We did not lie. We did not exaggerate. We were never hypnotized to tell our stories.  If the film wins an Oscar, it will be won at the expense of silencing the plaintive voices of abused children once again, just as our own voices were silenced 16 years ago by the threats and intimidation of our tormentors.

The victims went on to express that Jarecki had twisted the facts in the film to make it appear that they had.  The Academy had no comment to make when asked by the New York Times, and the film’s nomination remained.

To learn more about the damaging effects Andrew Jarecki’s film has caused the victims and their families, visit the Andrew Jarecki Lie’s Facebook page.